Time Dilation
Meteor

What is the difference between a meteor and a photon falling to the Earth?

 

The meteor travels faster, the further it falls, the photon does not. The meteor is easy to understand. It has linear mass and for the sake of argument, is not spinning. Gravitational attraction between the meteor and the Earth exerts a force that causes them to accelerate towards each other. The force is equal between planet and meteor which is why the Earth does not appear to move. The classical expression for this force is:

F = G

m1 m2

  R2

There are problems with this expression. It assumes the objects are static and have no dimension, both of which are wrong. This is explored in Gravitational Attraction but we can note that as only light can pass through the event horizon of a black hole, all falling objects have to convert to light as they approach it. What appears on the other side is another thing entirely, as discussed in Black Hole.

Black Holes
blackholes
Black Holes
The Universe
^

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blackholes

What of the photon?

In order to be captured by the planet, the photon has to ‘surrender’ some of its rotational inertia. I suspect the amount is a function of how much energy it has and how massive the gravity well of the planet is. Light that has a very low frequency of much less than 1Hz for example will not interact with the planet and pass through undetected this is discussed in photon decay.  

Photon Decay
Photon Decay
Photondecay

The Pushta: (Push-ta, as opposed to ejecta)

The spinning matter is gyroscopically stable. It spins so fast, it would be internally unstable and rip itself apart if it were not for the huge pressure preventing this. It cannot collapse into the more compact triangular form as the contra spin from the neighbours prevents this. This is also true for the layers above and below.

Everything that falls into a black hole is lost forever, right? Quasars are the brightest objects in the universe and they are supermassive black holes (Astronomers just have two names for the same thing). All that energy comes from the surface? How so? Material falls in on the galactic equator, how does it ‘magically’ get to the North and South pole?

 

Let’s just imagine that it falls in. How does it get out. The Quasar tells us; from the poles.

So we need to imagine a mechanism where this can happen. The material cannot be ejected, it would have to be travelling at greater than the speed of light. So it has to be pushed.

 

Anatomy of a black hole

A slice through the polar column (looking down)

Matter falls into the black hole at the galactic equator (white arrows). The matter contributes two components to the black hole: Its rotational momentum and its mass (bearing in mind that only light fell into it).  If matter were to fall directly into the black hole, for instance, material from outside its own galaxy, it would not contribute to its rotational momentum and would have to be pushed out (eventually; see below).

The matter has nowhere to go when it reaches the centre of the black hole. Now it is picked up by either the North or South Toroidal Motors (Blue zone). These are the twin hearts of the black hole and where almost all of its rotational momentum is stored as they spin about the poles (blue arrows). The matter circulates as shown by the black arrows (hmm). Note that the total rotational momentum of this motion is zero.

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The motors compress and order a small amount of matter along the axis of the poles (red line). Some is directed North and some South in equal measure. This material, see insert above, again has no rotational inertia as the spins are balanced but there may be some residual inertia from the motors giving the column a tiny amount of corkscrew.

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